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Single Tooth Dentures: Costs and Alternatives for Teeth Replacement

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What are single tooth dentures and how much do they cost in the US? The short answer is that they are a type of denture that fills the gap left by one missing tooth. If you are concerned about replacing a missing tooth and want to know more, this article will answer the following questions:

single tooth dentures
A false tooth to fill the gap left by one single tooth
  • Why replace missing teeth?
  • What are partial dentures?
  • Which types and materials are available?
  • How much do single tooth dentures cost in the US?
  • What are the alternatives to single tooth dentures?

Replacing a missing tooth will help improve your confidence and smile, and keep you looking and feeling great.

Why should you get a single tooth denture?

Filling gaps left by missing teeth is an important part of maintaining your facial structure and oral health, so you should always seek to replace them as soon as possible. This might mean that you need to wear a temporary denture until you decide on a more permanent solution.

Missing teeth don't just affect your smile, they can cause a multitude of other problems including:

  • Changes in the position and stability of your remaining teeth
  • Difficulty eating and speaking
  • Appearance
  • Increased risk of gum disease and cavities
  • Bone loss

A common question many people ask is, how long does it take to get dentures after teeth are pulled? The answer in most cases is right away. This is because the longer you wait to fill a gap, the more likely you are to experience some of these dental health issues.

If you think that you would be a good candidate for a single tooth denture, you can find a prosthodontist near you by calling 800-794-7437, where you'll speak with a live operator who can put you in touch with a dentist in your area.

Replacing a missing tooth

The first step to replacing a tooth is to speak with a dental professional and work out a treatment plan. There are a few ways to replace a missing tooth, but the cheapest option is to get a custom-made denture for one tooth.

one tooth denture cost
Partial dentures are the cheapest way to fill a gap

The process of creating a custom partial denture will take a few appointments to get the best fitting and comfortable result possible. The general steps to preparing a denture for a single tooth are:

  1. Have an appointment to get impressions of your jaw and bite
  2. The dentist will then make a model of your dentures and assess the color, shape, and fit
  3. Your denture will be made when you are happy with the model
  4. Final adjustments

What is a partial denture?

Partial dentures only replace a few missing teeth rather than all of them. A single tooth denture, which is sometimes known as a flipper tooth, fills the gap from just one missing tooth. Because it's only replacing one tooth and requires less material, the single tooth denture cost will be less than a partial denture that replaces multiple teeth.

What do single tooth dentures look like?

Generally, a single tooth denture looks like a single false tooth connected to a plastic salmon pink or gum-colored retainer. Sometimes there are metal or acrylic attachments and clasps. These help secure and support the denture to your remaining natural teeth.

Types and materials available

single tooth denture materials
There are different types of full and partial dentures

Replacement teeth can be made from a few different materials which include chrome, acrylic, and flexible base resins.

Valplast uses biocompatible nylon and thermoplastic resin to make its flexible dentures. Flexible base resins are the most comfortable materials used for dentures, but they can cost a little more. Another perk to flexible dentures is that no dental adhesive is needed to keep them in place.

Acrylic is the most durable, but it is a stiffer material and can potentially be a little uncomfortable. Dentures made from acrylic can also have metal clasps to keep them in place. Dentures made from metal are stronger, durable, and fit well.

Whichever denture material you choose, make sure that you ask your dentist how to properly clean it. Different materials can be damaged in the cleaning process, so it's important to follow instructions correctly. For example, soaking your dentures in Steradent overnight can be particularly harmful to certain materials.

How much do single tooth dentures cost in the US?

Dentures prices will vary depending on a variety of factors, including your dentist, where you live, and materials, but the price can range anywhere from $500 to $1,500.

If you have insurance, it could cover anywhere from 20% to 50% of your single tooth denture costs, but be aware of annual maximums and deductibles that your plan may require.

What are the alternatives to single tooth dentures?

While single tooth dentures are the cheapest option there are plenty of other alternatives for replacing missing teeth. Some of your options include dental implants and bridges.

dental implant free
Dental implants are a more permanent solution

Dental implants are the solution that is most like replacing your natural teeth. Implants can support a crown or several adjoined crowns, also known as a bridge or fixed bridge.

These are more permanent solutions to missing teeth, but they usually cost more than dentures.

Conclusion

It's a good idea to replace any gaps in your smile to maintain your dental health and prevent further problems down the line. There are plenty of options to choose from to replace missing teeth, depending on your budget and your needs.

Your dentist will help you make the right decision, as they will assess your teeth and make a treatment plan.

A denture for one tooth can be a temporary solution while you make a decision or save up the funds for a more permanent solution. If need be it can also be a perfectly good permanent solution that can last for years with regular cleaning and care.

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Contributors:
Amanda combines her medical background with her love for writing to bring you informed and accurate content at Dentaly.org.
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